Paddling with Pecha Kucha

images-4.jpegI lived for a full year from first hearing the phrase Pecha Kucha to understanding what it meant.  I thought it was thing for a presentation like emaze or Prezi or PowerPoint.  But it turned out to be a structure or discipline.  20 x 20.

Below is my absolute favourite tips page.  Love my green images?

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snake and robin

In over 35 years of teaching I had never done a slide presentation although I have seen many during training sessions and rarely enjoyed them. Most of my colleagues taught using presentations on whiteboards in every lesson.  I thought it might work well for maths or even history.  But English Literature or Theatre Studies?  Wouldn’t it be a stultifying way to teach? A way that might lead one to repeating the same lesson year-on-year for a completely different cohort of students?  I did show images on the white board.  They were just never an ordered presentation with bullet points.

So Luddite as I am I was not happy about this section of our MA in Irish Writing and Film.  But it has to be done.  I thought I would go for PowerPoint as my partner is a whizz with that.  Of course he had no idea what Pecha Kucha meant either.  When he saw what it was he felt that he had little to offer as it was not to his taste at all.  He prefers to be in control of the timing and to be able to play some appropriate music.  And pause for a few jokes.  And take questions as appropriate.  But he did agree to listen to my practice run.  I don’t think he thought much it. images.png

Advice from lecturers and peers has been that I should tell a story. I like a story. I like  Enda Walsh‘s story.  It is very interesting. He loves to tell it too.  In interview after interview you can find Enda Walsh telling his story.  And it’s more or less the same story every time he tells it.  The same key anecdotes offered up to the listening or reading public.  So there is no problem with a story.  But a story is generally chronological and descriptive – not very academic or analytical.  Nevertheless I will tell the story as it will be nice for people to hear it.

As Enda Walsh is a playwright and works in a visual art form there are lots of images to choose from.  Sadly most of these are close-ups of actors and I was looking for pictures of the entire sets.  I found some on set designers’ websites and on the GIAF website but these were not high resolution. Nevertheless they are in the Pecha Kucha because in spite of the reprographic quality they show the story I want to tell.

As I have boringly repeated to my peers many times, I went to Textualities16 last year.  It was great.  I saw lots of excellent presentations – each was excellent in its own way.  Some were breathtakingly skilful and creative technically, others gave brief but interesting insights into subjects about which I know zilch.  One was just a roller-coaster, delivered-too-fast, hilarious tour-de-force about Being John Malkovich.

My Pecha Kucha is complete.  The slides are chosen and ordered.  The narrative is written.  I forgot to do the storyboard thing but never mind.

Others are beavering away at the online presence and organisational matters.  Thanks to all of them.  Soon the day will come and we will strut our stuff.  Then it will be over.  Bring it on.

There are no works to cite.  Just follow the links.

 

 

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corkucopia

I am a Londoner living in the centre of Cork City and studying for an MA in Irish Writing and Film at University College Cork. Even though I have lived more of my life in London than elsewhere, and even though I love London with an indescribable passion, I am falling in love with Cork as well. It is such a cornucopia of Irish culture; scarcely a week goes by without something interesting happening. That is why this blog is called Corkucopia. I want to celebrate the city as well as Irish Writing and Film and, indeed, Irishness itself.

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